Film Is Not Dead * New Orleans

It's hard to know where to start a post like this one; I feel like this is one of those where I just have to let the photos speak for themselves. But maybe a little back story would help?

I've been following Jonathan Canlas and his film work for a long, long time, and I've wanted to go to a photography workshop for about that long. I've always kept an eye on his Film is Not Dead workshop and thought "I'd like to go to this but I probably don't know enough/won't know enough/ok, fine I'm just intimidated." So last spring, I said "DAMMIT I'M DOING THIS" and registered for Film is Not Dead in New Orleans (and Katherine signed up, too, which made it an easier decision! It's nice to have a partner in crime.)

I had been shooting film on my mom's Nikkormat from the 60's, which is a great old Nikon, but it's pretty finicky with light; after registering for the workshop, I found a Mamiya 645 and starting practicing. I primarily have used it for personal work thus far, and I've fallen in love. It's definitely been a learning curve, but I love the feel and look of film. While I appreciate the convenience and ease of digital, I do feel that shooting film is making me in to a more careful and thoughtful digital photographer, as well. Also? It's such a great feeling to get film back and see the results.

The workshop was absolutely worth it. Aside from the shooting, camera, and technical and business aspects of everything we learned, I met a great group of women (yes, for some reason the workshop ended up being all women!) photographers from all over the country. I feel like I can ask any of them for help, critique, or just advice.

Here are a few favorites from the workshop; these are a combination of a personal shoot day, a day with models, night shooting, and then photographing around town and outside of New Orleans at Oak Alley Plantation just for fun.

Thanks so much to Jon and Catherine, and all of you fantastic women who made this workshop great. I loved meeting you all!